Meet Dr. Brutus

*Results may vary
By |May 4th, 2013|News, Videos
  • Dr. Brutus invited to the “Les Docteurs” TV show Dr. Brutus invited to the “Les Docteurs” TV show

    Dr. Brutus invited to the “Les Docteurs” TV show

Dr. Brutus invited to the “Les Docteurs” TV show

*Results may vary Dr. Brutus invited to the “Les Docteurs” TV show (in French) to discuss the Endoscopic trigger finger surgery. November 7, 2012 broadcast on CBC, 16 pm
By |March 9th, 2013|Medias
  • Best Health Mag
    Dr. Brutus was published in Best Health Canada Dr. Brutus was published in Best Health Canada

    Dr. Brutus was published in Best Health Canada

Dr. Brutus was published in Best Health Canada

*Results may vary Dr. Brutus talks about the Endoscopic method to treat the carpal tunnel syndrome in a article that was published in Best health Canada. Click on Best Health Canada_May 2012 to read it.
By |March 9th, 2013|Medias

Press release: Canadian first at the Montreal Institute for Special Surgery

*Results may vary A revolutionary stitchless surgery with minimal downtime is now available to patients suffering from trigger fingers. Montreal (Quebec), January 12th, 2012 – A new minimally invasive endoscopic surgical procedure for trigger finger release has been performed for the first time in Canada, right here in Quebec. Until now, a few specialized hand surgeons in Japan, Italy and the United States only offered this technique. A trigger finger is a painful condition due to inflammation around the flexor tendons of the fingers causing the fingers to catch, snap or lock with attempted flexion. Opening the hand is then painful and sometimes requires the assistance of the other hand. In advanced cases, fingers can remain totally locked. One or more fingers can be affected. The condition is common after forty, as well as in manual workers and diabetics. Dexterity and grip strength are affected. Dr. Jean-Paul Brutus now performs this new technique under local anesthesia, in a matter of minutes, using two tiny access holes per finger. A high definition mini camera is introduced along with a specially designed cutting instrument to divide only the ligament responsible for the locking while preserving all other tissues of the hand. Stitches are not required. Traditional open surgery requires a one-inch incision in the palm to divide this ligament. This technique is efficient but requires six to eight weeks to heal and fully recover because important tissues have been cut open to access the ligament. This may result in stiffness due to adhesions and scarring around the tendons. Dr. Brutus says that the great benefits of the new technique are that stitches and a dressing are not required and that free use of the hand is possible after 48 hours. Downtime […]
By |March 9th, 2013|News