• Construction Workers: Don’t Let Carpal Tunnel Gain the Upper Hand Construction Workers: Don’t Let Carpal Tunnel Gain the Upper Hand

    Construction Workers: Don’t Let Carpal Tunnel Gain the Upper Hand

Construction Workers: Don’t Let Carpal Tunnel Gain the Upper Hand

Thousands of workers are getting ready to go back to work as Quebec’s annual construction holiday comes to an end. As carpenters, joiners, heavy machine operators, bricklayers, tile layers, and painters are getting ready to pick their tools up once again, it’s worth reminding them about good practices to avoid hurting their hands at work and prevent the development of carpal tunnel syndrome.   First, let’s remember that carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when the median nerve inside the carpel tunnel in your wrist is compressed. Symptoms can appear for several reasons, including repeated flexing and gripping, which are particularly common in construction work since workers are often using tools that vibrate and that need to be held up or kept in place for long periods of time.   SYMPTOMS Carpal tunnel syndrome has many symptoms. Construction workers should pay special attention to the warning signs if they don’t want to put their health at risk. The aftereffects may be irreversible if the condition is not diagnosed and treated in time. So, stay alert: a tinging or burning sensation, lack of feeling, weakness in the wrist, numbness at night, wrist, palm, hand, or even forearm pain, and difficulty holding objects are just a few of the problems associated with carpal tunnel.   PREVENTION There are many preventative measures that can be taken to keep from developing carpal tunnel syndrome. Here are a few simple tips especially for construction workers:   Make sure that you move in a way that follows the natural axis of the wrist. Take time to reposition the tools you are using if your wrists are in flexion. If your workspace or tools are inadequate, talk to your immediate supervisor about them. Review with them how you work and make your […]
By |August 15th, 2017|News

Meet Dr. Brutus

*Results may vary
By |May 4th, 2013|News, Videos
  • Dr. Brutus invited to the “Les Docteurs” TV show Dr. Brutus invited to the “Les Docteurs” TV show

    Dr. Brutus invited to the “Les Docteurs” TV show

Dr. Brutus invited to the “Les Docteurs” TV show

*Results may vary Dr. Brutus invited to the “Les Docteurs” TV show (in French) to discuss the Endoscopic trigger finger surgery. November 7, 2012 broadcast on CBC, 16 pm
By |March 9th, 2013|Medias
  • Best Health Mag
    Dr. Brutus was published in Best Health Canada Dr. Brutus was published in Best Health Canada

    Dr. Brutus was published in Best Health Canada

Dr. Brutus was published in Best Health Canada

*Results may vary Dr. Brutus talks about the Endoscopic method to treat the carpal tunnel syndrome in a article that was published in Best health Canada. Click on Best Health Canada_May 2012 to read it.
By |March 9th, 2013|Medias

Press release: Canadian first at the Montreal Institute for Special Surgery

*Results may vary A revolutionary stitchless surgery with minimal downtime is now available to patients suffering from trigger fingers. Montreal (Quebec), January 12th, 2012 – A new minimally invasive endoscopic surgical procedure for trigger finger release has been performed for the first time in Canada, right here in Quebec. Until now, a few specialized hand surgeons in Japan, Italy and the United States only offered this technique. A trigger finger is a painful condition due to inflammation around the flexor tendons of the fingers causing the fingers to catch, snap or lock with attempted flexion. Opening the hand is then painful and sometimes requires the assistance of the other hand. In advanced cases, fingers can remain totally locked. One or more fingers can be affected. The condition is common after forty, as well as in manual workers and diabetics. Dexterity and grip strength are affected. Dr. Jean-Paul Brutus now performs this new technique under local anesthesia, in a matter of minutes, using two tiny access holes per finger. A high definition mini camera is introduced along with a specially designed cutting instrument to divide only the ligament responsible for the locking while preserving all other tissues of the hand. Stitches are not required. Traditional open surgery requires a one-inch incision in the palm to divide this ligament. This technique is efficient but requires six to eight weeks to heal and fully recover because important tissues have been cut open to access the ligament. This may result in stiffness due to adhesions and scarring around the tendons. Dr. Brutus says that the great benefits of the new technique are that stitches and a dressing are not required and that free use of the hand is possible after 48 hours. Downtime […]
By |March 9th, 2013|News